Anaxagoras of Clazomenae: Fragments and Testimonia by Patricia Curd

By Patricia Curd

Anaxagoras of Clazomenae (circa. 500 B.C.-428 B.C.) was once reportedly the 1st Presocratic thinker to settle in Athens. He used to be a chum of Pericles and his principles are mirrored within the works of Sophocles and Aristophanes. Anaxagoras asserted that brain is the ordering precept of the cosmos, he defined sun eclipses, and he wrote on a myriad of astronomical, meteorological, and organic phenomena. His metaphysical declare that every little thing is in every little thing and his rejection of the opportunity of coming to be or passing away are basic to all his different perspectives. due to his philosophical doctrines, Anaxagoras used to be condemned for impiety and exiled from Athens.

This quantity provides the entire surviving fragments of Anaxagoras' writings, either the Greek texts and unique facing-page English translations for every. Generously supplemented, it contains designated annotations, in addition to 5 essays that give some thought to the philosophical and interpretive questions raised through Anaxagoras. additionally incorporated are new translations of the traditional testimonia pertaining to Anaxagoras' lifestyles and paintings, displaying the significance of the thinker and his principles for his contemporaries and successors.

This is a much-needed and hugely expected exam of Anaxagoras of Clazomenae, one of many forerunners of Greek philosophical and medical thought.

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Sœmpanti xr| doke”n \ne”nai p‡nta xr}mata. < > ✱ ✠ ✑ ✁ ✬ ✆ ★ ✪ ✌ ✄ ✲ ✜ ✱ ✁ ✑ ✞ ✓ ✪ ✗ ✁ ✆ ✓ ✌ ✎ ✖ ✑ ✁ ✁ ✁ ✆ ✓ ✁ ✄ ✷ ✌ ✄ ✄ ✑ ✁ ✖ ✆ ✷ ✠ ✟ ❃ ✆ ✄ ✁ ✆ ✂ ✆ ❱ b5 Simplicius in Phys. 9 ✁ ✁ ✠ ● ✆ ✄ ✡ ✄ ✆ ✄ ✆ ✁ ✞ ✑ ✠ ✎ ✄ ★ ✄ ✆ ✎ ✞ ✄ ✁ ✞ ✁ ✑ ✁ ✄ ❀ ❀ ✠ ✆ ✥ ✖ ✠ ✄ ✄ ✖ ✞ ✱ ✁ ✆ ✲ ✁ ✵ ✁ ✞ ✄ ✜ ✜ ❅ ✑ ✁ ● ✍ ✌ ✠ ✲ ✬ ✮ toœtvn d o¹tv diakekrimŽnvn ginQskein xr}, Ðti p‡nta o[dn \l‡ssv \st“n o[d ple’v (o[ gˆr únust˜n p‡ntvn ple’v eånai), úllˆ p‡nta æsa úe’. ✪ ✆ ✡ ✜ ✄ ✼ ✜ ✆ ❇ ❃ ✁ ✁ ✱ ✑ ✑ ✖ ✆ ✷ ✆ ✄ ✄ ✞ ☎ ✁ ✁ ✁ ✖ ✁ ✄ ✷ ✄ ✡ ✖ ✱ ✑ ☞ ✄ ✑ ✁ ❀ ✆ ✥ ✖ ✠ ✄ ✝ ✄ ❀ ✖ ✞ ✁ ✞ ✠ ✆ ❱ b6 Simplicius in Phys.

Defenders of the manuscript text (with various translations and interpretations) ¨ include Lanza, Guthrie, Johrens, Raven, Stokes, and Wright (Presocratics). 14 See Wright Presocratics 124; Schofield 80 and 156–57 n. 15. ¨ 15 Both Cornford (Plato 56 n. 1; ‘Matter’ 278) and Johrens (who ultimately rejects the emendation; 19) argue that the < > is necessary for good grammatical sense. 16 As it stands, this is not a reasoned response to Zeno’s arguments about division, but simply a retort. For a full discussion of the issue of Zeno and Anaxagoras, see Schofield 80–82 with notes.

Omits , which I have included here; but at in Phys. 4–9, Simplicius quotes all of b4b (except the last sentence) without pause. The last sentence of b4b as reconstructed by Diels is part of the quotation at in Phys. 25–26. (omitted at in Phys. 21 by 5 Sider argues that Simplicius. See the Notes. ✝ ✞ ✠ ☛ ✌ ✎ ✑ ✓ ✕ ✝ ✪ ✖ ✘ ✘ ✚ ✞ ✠ ✪ ☛ ✝ ✪ ✓ ✓ ✵ ✩ ✵ ✜ ✢ ✓ ✮ ✣ ✤ ✥ ✓ ✑ ✣ ✝ ✓ ✪ ✧ ★ ✓ ✑ ✳ ✧ 19 The Fragments and Their Contexts b4b And again, he says, ‘Before there was separation off, because all things were together, there was not even any colour evident; for the mixture of all things prevented it, of the wet and the dry and of the hot and the cold and of the bright and the dark, and there was much earth present and seeds unlimited in number, 6 in no way similar to one another.

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Anaxagoras of Clazomenae: Fragments and Testimonia by Patricia Curd
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